Deutsch | Italiano
Project AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject AfricaProject Africa

Project Africa

The basecamp is located in the Maasai Mara region in Kenya. A family from Switzerland, Giulya and myself recently went there to visit.

I had already been told about all the things that would come our way on this trip. We set off a little anxious and worried but filled with curiosity. The flight was smooth and very pleasant. As soon as we touched down safely in Nairobi though, I felt better. We stayed in a nice, very safe hotel in Nairobi. I immediately made friends with a lovely stray cat. She was well-fed, which calmed me down a bit. Sadly, I was not allowed to touch her or stroke her but the beautiful, torn-eared grey tabby still lay down next to me. So, things got off to a good start really.

We went on the next day. On the way to Maasai Mara, we flew over a magnificent world of wildlife, a wonderful wilderness, then we continued by jeep. Africa is a place of many things: Poverty and grace, joy, rich in beauty, immensity, treasures, adventure. That's Maasai Mara in Africa.

Please forgive me if I don't mention the living conditions of the local people just now, we were on our way to provide a better working environment for a few people with everything that is needed to make their work easier. The rest is told by all the pictures we took on our trip. Now we have made a start. As ‘Kuppelrain’, we want to work with our Swiss friends to expand the kitchen and catering in the camps, especially with work assignments, exchange, training and support.

If the kitchen in the bush is good and works, there will certainly be many guests who will spend their adventure holidays in Massai Mara. This, in turn, creates jobs for the local population. I would like to see tourism with great respect for people, animals and the environment. By the way, Kenya has a ban on plastic bags, the government does not allow plastic to be imported. But there is still far too much plastic rubbish lying around. It's a shame, but perhaps we will find people who can tackle this problem. There was one surprise towards the end of our journey. On the last day, the camp where we were staying was visited by a woman who is delivering aid in Maasai Mara. I went up to her and thought about how I could talk to her. Then I tried Italian and was overjoyed to realise she also comes from South Tyrol.